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The Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) is the police agency responsible for law enforcement and investigations within the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It is the oldest municipal police agency in the United States, and the fourth largest municipal law enforcement agency in the country (behind the NYPD, Chicago Police Department, and LAPD).

Notable events in historyEdit

In 1881, the Philadelphia Police Department hired its first African-American police officer.

In 1887, the police department was put under control of the city's Department of Public Safety. Two years later, the PPD inaugurated its mounted patrol (which was recently disbanded in 2004).

In 1906, the motorcycle was introduced to the Philadelphia police.

In 1939, radio-installed patrol cars were put into use.

In 1964, a race riot breaks out in North Philadelphia calling every police officer in the city to duty.[1]

In 1967, Frank Rizzo becomes police commissioner of Philadelphia.

In 1970, a well publicized raid of the Black Panther Party occurs.[2][3][4]

In 1979, the PPD reached its peak size at approximately 8,500 officers.

In 1981, Officer Daniel Faulkner was shot while arresting a motorist. Journalist and former Black Panther Mumia Abu-Jamal (né Wesley Cook), was charged with Officer Faulkner's murder (as he allegedly admitted to shooting Faulkner upon arrival in the hospital for treatment for wounds suffered when Officer Faulkner returned fire). The incident, subsequent trial and conviction of Jamal remains a topic of controversy in the United States and around the world.

In 1985, the Philadelphia Police dropped a mixture of civilian and military explosives on a "home-made" wood bunker, built on the roof of the Osage Avenue house occupied by members of the MOVE organization. The bomb ignited several barrels of gasoline starting a fire which destroyed the entire block and killed eleven people.

In the early 1990s, a corruption scandal centered around officers in the department's 39th district in North Philadelphia led to the prosecutions of 6 officers, and attracted nationwide attention.

In just over a year spanning from October 2007 to November 2008, five Philadelphia Police officers were killed in the line of duty during various crimes. Those lost were Officer Charles Cassidy, Sergeant Stephen Liczbinski, Officer Isabel Nazario, Officer Patrick McDonald who was posthumously promoted to Sergeant, and Sergeant Timothy Simpson.

Present-day Philadelphia Police DepartmentEdit

File:Philadelphia Police Department HQ.png

The current Philadelphia Police Department employs more than 6,600 officers, and patrols an area of 369.4 km² (142.6 mi²) with a population of almost 1.5 million. The department is subdivided into twenty-three patrol districts, and like many other large municipal police forces, it incorporates many special units such as a K-9 squad, SWAT, community relations unit, and harbor patrol. The highest-ranking officer, the Commissioner, is Charles H. Ramsey, a former Chicago police officer and former Chief of the Metropolitan Police Department of the District of Columbia.

Special aspects of the Philadelphia Police Department Edit

File:Philadelphia Police - cruiser on Ben Franklin Parkway.jpeg

The Philadelphia Police Department has several unique features which distinguish it from other municipal police agencies. One of these features is the department's Hero Scholarship Thrill Show, which is a 45-year-old program designed to provide funds for the college education of the children of PPD and Philadelphia Fire Department officers slain or disabled in the line of duty. Funds are raised through ticket sales for the Thrill Show, which features police and fire department demonstrations, exhibits, and games.

Another unique aspect of the Philadelphia Police is its use of a Strategic Intervention Tactical Enforcement (S.I.T.E) special unit. The Philadelphia SITE Unit serves one role within the department:to serve as a specialized anti-crime task force in high-crime areas of the city. The PPD's SITE unit serves as an elite group who work directly for the current Police Commissioner within the department, and has only a many other counterparts in other cities that do the same, most notably Boston's Special Operations Unit. The S.I.T.E. unit was disbanded to much the dismay of many politicians in February 2008. The new police Commissioner stated he would bring it back in the end of the summer if there was no serious reduction in crime.

Mounted Unit Edit

The beginnings of the Mounted Unit can be traced to the Fairmount Park Mounted Guard created in 1867. In 1889 the Philadelphia Police Mounted Patrol Unit was established. The Philadelphia Police unit survived until 1952, however, the Fairmount Park unit would be used for parades and crowd control measures. The Fairmount Park Mounted Guard became the Fairmount Park Police in 1966, but maintained the same responsibilities. In 1972, Mayor Frank Rizzo found it unnecessary for taxpayers to fund two separate police departments, and merged the Fairmount Park Police into the Philadelphia Police, creating the Park Division. The mounted unit was once again used to patrol the streets of Philadelphia. The mounted unit survived to celebrate 100 years in 1989, but was disbanded in 2004 due to budgetary cuts by Mayor John F. Street's administration.

On July 18, 2008, Philadelphia Police Commissioner Charles H. Ramsey confirmed that plans are in the works to recreate the mounted unit.

Ranks within the Department Edit

Title Insignia Uniform Shirt Color Type of Rank
Police Commissioner
White
Appointed Position by City's Managing Director with Approval of Mayor
Deputy Police Commissioner 3-star <center>White Appointed Position by City's Managing Director with Approval of Mayor
Deputy Police Commissioner 2-Star <center>White Civil Service Rank
Deputy Police Commissioner 1-Star <center>White Civil Service Rank
Chief Inspector <center>White Civil Service Rank
Inspector
US-O5 insignia
<center>White Civil Service Rank
Staff Inspector
US-O4 insignia
<center>White Civil Service Rank
Captain <center>White Civil Service Rank
Lieutenant <center>White Civil Service Rank
Sergeant <center>White Civil Service Rank
Corporal/Detective <center>Blue Civil Service Rank
Police Officer <center>Blue Civil Service Rank
Police Officer Recruit <center>Blue

The ranks of Corporal and Detective have the same pay grade, but have two entirely different functions. Corporal are "Operations Supervisors" and are responsible for overseeing a Patrol District's Operations Room, or a Special Unit's Operations; i.e.: that reports are submitted accurately and in a timely manner, etc. Only in a few rare instances do Corporals work the street, with the noted exception of S.I.T.E. Unit and SWAT tactical units.

Detectives come under the Detective Bureau, and are assigned primarely to Divisional Detective Units, and specialized units like Homicide, Organized Crime / Intelligence, and Background Investigation. There are also Police Officers who serve in an investigative capacity, such as in the Juvenile Aid and Special Victims Units. They are paid in the same pay scale as a Police Officer assigned to Patrol.

Unlike most law enforcement agencies (but similar to the Los Angeles Police Department), the Philadelphia Police Department Detective Bureau does not maintain the ranks of Detective Sergeant, Detective Lieutenant, etc.

Highest Ranking OfficialsEdit

File:Philadelphia Police - gang with vehicle.jpeg

Police Marshalls Edit

  • John J. Keyser, 1850 - 1853
  • John K. Murphy, 1853 - 1855

Chiefs of Police Edit

  • Samuel G. Ruggles, 1855 - 1867
  • St. Clair A. Mulhalland, 1867 - 1872
  • Kennard Jones, 1872 - 1879
  • Samuel L. Given, 1879 - 1884
  • James Stewart, 1884 - 1887
  • James Lamon, 1887 - 1892

Superintendents of Police Edit

  • Robert Linden, 1892 - 1899
  • Harry M. Quick, 1899 - 1904
  • John B. Taylor, 1904 - 1912
  • James Robinson, 1912 - 1920
  • William B. Mills, 1920 - 1931
  • Joseph E. Lestrange, 1931 - 1936
  • James H. Malone, 1936 - 1937
  • Edward Hubbs, 1937 - 1940
  • Howard P. Sutton, 1950 - 1952

Police Commissioners Edit

Demographics Edit

  • Male: 70%
  • Female: 30%
  • White: 55.6%
  • African-American/Black: 36.4%
  • Hispanic: 6.5%
  • Other: 1.5%

[5]

Wall of HonorEdit

The City of Philadelphia honors those men and women who have died while serving in the line of duty. The memorial plaque is located in the courtyard of Philadelphia City Hall. It resided on the southeast corner of where Broad and Market Street would meet if they continued through the building.

(NOTE: Prior to 1972, the Fairmount Park Police Department (FPPD) functioned as a separate unit within the City of Philadelphia. Members of the FPPD, who fell in the line of duty are included in the below list with the letters "FPPD" after their name)

Unless otherwise noted, the rank of those below is Police Officer.

Night Officer William Baker, December 26, 1851 Watchman Neil Mooney, May 25, 1856 Dennis Sullivan, June 14, 1870
Lewis Lare, August 21, 1872 Daniel McGonigle, October 9, 1872 Henry O'Donnell, July 4, 1876
George McGonigal, February 18, 1877 George Jackson, May 23, 1887 William D. Johnston, October 3, 1887
Elmer Findley, December 29, 1891 John Chambers, September 10, 1894 Charles O. Conaway, November 10, 1900
Edward George, December 27, 1902 John J. Donovan, September 25, 1903 Matthew J. Curran, May 26, 1905
Thomas A. Sheldon, January 6, 1906 Frank Slaymaker, June 6, 1906 Aug. F. Brusius, February 23, 1907
Scott H. Shelley, January 5, 1908 Thomas A. Gordon, April 9, 1908 Edward Mooney, December 19, 1908
Robert Simons, February 17, 1909 James O'Brien, February 4, 1910 William Weiss, May 8, 1910
George Barnett, November 28, 1910 Morris Gelles, December 22, 1910 Joseph Dolphin, February 17, 1912
Thomas Dowling, June 26, 1912 David M. Simpson, September 21, 1912 George Freeman, September 24, 1912
John Mann, August 4, 1913 Frank A. Sankey, September 18, 1914 Detective James Maneely, March 25, 1915
Detective Harry E. Tucker, April 24, 1915 Vincent J. Moore, August 11, 1916 John F. Smith, October 28, 1916
Fredrick J. Weingard, July 23, 1917 Detective Frank J. McCartney, August 30, 1917 George Eppley, September 19, 1917
Detective George L. Williams, January 9, 1918 Charles T. Dewees, January 12, 1918 Thompson Black, January 18, 1918
James Wilson, January 21, 1918 Thomas J. McVay, July 28, 1918 John J. Knox, January 27, 1919
George Dingwall, January 27, 1919 Charles Danowitz, March 9, 1919 Walter S. Gideon, March 13, 1919
James J. Hess, March 14, 1919 Joseph T. Swiercynski, March 20, 1919 Abner Braun, May 27, 1919
Conrad E. Gibson, October 4, 1919 Charles B. Jones, October 5, 1919 John E. Price, April 19, 1920
Walter H. Hodges, May 11, 1920 William J. Boyd Jr., May 12, 1920 Dominic E. Nesavage, September 12, 1920
Detective Joseph P. McGinn, October 3, 1920 John J. McAntee, October 22, 1920 Edward W. Kunz, October 28, 1920
Edward W. Holtry, January 17, 1921 William J. Davis, January 29, 1921 Edward S. Boynton, October 4, 1921
Edward W. Kelly, November 16, 1921 Guard Vincent A. Hanley, FPPD, November 26, 1921 Harry J. Stauffer, March 16, 1922
Thomas Brady, April 24, 1922 James A. Lambert, July 16, 1922 John J. Toomey, August 26, 1922
Bartholomew J. Coen, October 6, 1922 Thomas F. Gallagher, November 3, 1922 William Miles, February 21, 1923
Thomas Wilkinson, April 19, 1923 Harry R. Reinhart, March 23, 1924 Detective Truman Swain, July 5, 1924
Thomas J. Nihill, September 21, 1924 Robert Wise, November 30, 1924 Harry C. Lomas, March 26, 1925
John F. Creevy, June 9, 1925 Albert Steward, October 24, 1925 Frank P. Cook, December 16, 1925
Harry Manley Cooper, May 4, 1926 Joseph Edward Bell, December 23, 1926 Charles F. Gay, January 7, 1927
William Slook, January 14, 1927 Robert A. McGarvey, February 24, 1927 John J. Watson, April 18, 1927
Edward C. Plenskofski, August 8, 1927 Gottlob Klemmer, September 11, 1927 Watchman Steven Heimer, January 8, 1928
Charles A. Fry, February 21, 1928 Detective Joseph Etriss, March 25, 1928 Harry Feinberg, March 30, 1928
Charles J. Sheer, December 10, 1928 Inspector John W. Blackburn, January 17, 1929 James M. Justice, March 1, 1929
Michael Donnelly, April 12, 1929 William T. Page, April 21, 1929 Phillip A. Bruce, November 9, 1929
Asst. Superintendent James J. Hearn, November 27, 1930 John C. Keen, February 27, 1931 Elmer E. Patterson, June 6, 1931
Captain Harry B. Price, June 20, 1931 Raymond Carey, July 13, 1931 Detective Edward J. Gahan, August 15, 1931
Joseph V. Campbell Jr., October 23, 1931 Thomas J. Fitzgerald, November 7, 1931 Albert J. Stokes, February 3, 1932
Sergeant Walter Steinbaker, February 21, 1932 William J. Henderson, March 3, 1932 David H. Wiley, April 10, 1932
Nolan Eugene Tipton, June 25, 1932 Joseph C. Meiers, July 7, 1932 Isadore Reinheimer, August 2, 1932
Detective Michael G. Croskey, December 7, 1932 Fred J. Dolan, January 26, 1933 Detective Louis Moore, June 16, 1933
Charles H. Stockberger, July 14, 1933 Harry Donahue, February 19, 1934 Matthew Clowry, March 31, 1934
Alphonso Bonavitacola, July 28, 1934 William C. Wilson, September 3, 1934 Paul Hathaway, October 4, 1934
Edwin W. Welsh, November 10, 1934 William Bunker Hinchliffe, April 24, 1935 William H. McCloskey, May 5, 1935
Thomas J. McErlane, July 4, 1935 James T. Morrow, November 23, 1936 Guard Michael McKenna, FPPD, May 17, 1937
Guard Martin Clasby, FPPD, December 31, 1937 Henry Berry, March 30, 1938 Edward Bradley, February 2, 1941
James J. Clarke, February 11, 1941 Captain Hugh F. McCann, June 13, 1941 William J. Henderson, December 25, 1941
Thomas J. Wixted, March 15, 1942 Karl F. Kohler, August 12, 1943 Eugene J. Chavis, May 20, 1944
Guard William A. Doyle, FPPD, January 8, 1945 John F. Schaefer, March 31, 1945 Charles W. Brown, November 27, 1946
Henry Hicks, December 24, 1946 Cecil Ingling, January 30, 1947 James J. Quigley, April 3, 1947
Guard Thomas A. Ryan, FPPD, April 8, 1947 Sergeant Samuel Hewitt, April 23, 1947 Wallace B. Chapman, June 13, 1948
Sergeant Michael J. Hunt, August 4, 1948 Norman Stinger, January 25, 1949 Vincent P. Foley, March 20, 1949
George Mitchell, December 31, 1949 James J. Donahue, May 14, 1950 Sanford S. Smith, July 15, 1950
Louis Toriello, October 6, 1950 John Stanley Gordon, February 28, 1951 James J. Auter, October 15, 1953
Joseph J. DiDomenico, October 30, 1953 Albert Savich, December 13, 1953 John S. Colonna, December 24, 1953
Aux. P.O. William James Henhoeffer, December 25, 1955 Edward Flynn, August 15, 1956 Daniel Meehan, January 11, 1957
Stella Donahue, January 11, 1957 Robert T. Roberts, November 28, 1957 James F. Kane, June 5, 1959
Joseph A. Reiss, August 8, 1959 Joseph Franceschino, October 26, 1959 William Duross, April 15, 1960
Joseph McLaughlin, October 14, 1960 William Powell, November 19, 1960 James F. Christie, November 27, 1961
Lieutenant Daniel J. McCann, July 30, 1964 Guard Joseph Sankey, FPPD, September 9, 1964 Raymond Lovett, December 7, 1965
George Jacobs, July 15, 1966 Richard Rehmann, July 28, 1966 Robert D. White, September 2, 1966
Ernest Schwoeble, November 13, 1967 Ross Brackett, July 15, 1968 William Lackman, October 17, 1968
David Ellerbee, November 1, 1968 Charles R. Reynolds, October 26, 1969 Frederick Cione, January 30, 1970
Harry Lee Davis, April 6, 1970 Sergeant Frank R. Von Colln, FPPD, August 29, 1970 John M. McEntee Jr., February 20, 1971
Joseph V. Kelly, February 21, 1971 Detective Douglas J. Alexander, February 9, 1972 Raymond Fredericksdorf, February 19, 1972
Dominic Guglielmi, March 31, 1972 Leo Paul Van Winkle, June 27, 1972 James F. Duffin, January 14, 1973
Louis J. Vasger, April 13, 1973 David F. Sampson, December 12, 1973 Sergeant Michael S. Lingham, April 14, 1974
Sergeant William J. Kelleher, May 15, 1974 James A. McKale Jr., September 15, 1974 Allan H. Lewin, April 10, 1975
Ronald Trumbette, May 23, 1975 Artimus Johnson, October 20, 1975 Corporal William L. Daniels, December 16, 1975
John S. Trettin, February 29, 1976 James E. Griffin, March 5, 1976 Lieutenant Walter Szwajkowski, June 27, 1976
Francis W. Magro, March 30, 1977 James J. Ramp, August 8, 1978 Artis Norris, July 11, 1979
Sergeant Wilfred Doyle, December 21, 1979 William Washington, January 16, 1980 Robert S. Smith, April 23, 1980
Ernest W. Davis, July 16, 1980 Garrett T. (Gary) Farrell, September 26, 1980 James N. Mason, May 10, 1981
Daniel J. Faulkner, December 9, 1981 Richard Lendell, January 14, 1983 Sandra Griffin, February 13, 1983
Stephen E. Sawka, June 18, 1983 John Francis Duffy, December 10, 1983 Sergeant John H. McGill, December 17, 1983
William G. McCracken, February 5, 1984 James A. Rementer, May 21, 1985 Thomas Joseph Trench, May 28, 1985
Charles Patrick O'Hanlon, November 13, 1985 Sergeant Ralph M. Galdi, March 31, 1986 Daniel T. Gleason, June 5, 1986
William D. McCarthy, September 22, 1987 Albert A. Valentino, October 23, 1989 Winfred S. Hunter, June 4, 1990
Joaquin Montijo, June 15, 1990 Freddie Dukes, December 25, 1990 Daniel R. Boyle, February 6, 1991
Charles Thomas Knox, August 30, 1992 Robert Hayes, June 17, 1993 Stephen Dmytryk, November 16, 1993
Joseph Friel, December 4, 1994 Kevin Williams, July 31, 1995 Lauretha Vaird, January 2, 1996
Robert Porter, January 19, 1996 Pauline Harness, June 18, 1996 Detective John Cousin, August 15, 1996
Leddie James Brown, December 11, 1997 Jose M. Ortiz, September 21, 2000 Thomas M. Bray, November 13, 2001
Detective Anthony Johnson, January 7, 2003 Paris Williams Sr., June 21, 2005 Gary Skerski, May 8, 2006
Walter T. Barclay Jr., August 19, 2007 Charles Cassidy, November 1, 2007 Sergeant Stephen Liczbinski, May 3, 2008
Isabel Nazario, September 5, 2008 Sergeant Patrick McDonald, September 23, 2008 Sergeant Timothy Simpson, November 17, 2008

Popular cultureEdit

  • The Philadelphia Police Department is featured in the 1978 zombie film Dawn of the Dead in which the PPD S.W.A.T. team clears out a tenement building which was harboring the undead.
  • The 1983 comedy Trading Places, Dan Aykroyd's character is detained and questioned by members of the PPD.
  • The 1985 thriller Witness features Harrison Ford's character as a detective in the PPD who is hunted by corrupt members of the department.
  • The PPD's Recruit Training Academy was featured in an episode of Da Ali G Show in which Ali G participates in several police training exercises.
  • The police/drama series Cold Case involves detectives of the PPD.
  • The 1990 action/comedy Downtown featuring Anthony Edwards and Forest Whitaker. Police officer Alex Kearney works in a rich plush Philadelphia suburb.
  • The PPD is shown assisting members of the Baltimore Police Department on a 2002 episode of The Wire during the extradition and arrest of criminal Wee-Bey Brice.
  • The PPD is featured in the series Presidential Agent written by W.E.B. Griffin.
  • The PPD is featured in the series Badge of Honor written by W.E.B. Griffin.
  • The PPD is also featured in the 2007 film Shooter, starring Mark Wahlberg.
  • The PPD is also featured in the 2008 BBC documentary Law and Disorder in Philadelphia, presented by Louis Theroux.

Contact InformationEdit

One Franklin Square
Philadelphia
PA 19106
Phone: (215) 686-1776

See alsoEdit


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ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

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